Blogging: From comments to blogs

Tween Tribune (http://tweentribune.com/) offers a fantastic venue for students to learn about the world and to learn how to participate in the blogging world.

Tween Tribune Commenting

Students read and comment on Tween Tribune.

After we learned how commenting works with our notecard blogs, we next turned our attention to Tween Tribune to respond to the information from other people in the news.

What happened? Here’s a reflection in student words:

Rocke said, “I love Tween Tribune because it gives me an opportunity to catch up on the latest celebrity gossip,animal action,and tween heros!”

Ania wrote: “I think Tween Tribune is fun and interesting. You get to explore the web and express your feelings about other peoples accomplishments . I learn about all the cool stuff people do in life that are good things. Tween Tribune helps me in this classroom because writing comments about things isn’t just saying stuff; it’s about doin’ it right and good.”

Kimy added, “I like tween tribune because I like posting comments and reading interesting blogs. My favorite blog is the one about Obama gets a beanie dog. I love that blog because it is interesting. The tween tribune helps us kids by us reading blogs and writing comments. It also tells us what goes on in the world.”

Rista commented that “I like tween tribune  because it is fun and it helps us with our typing. It also helps us with our commenting. I like going on the computer and telling how I feel. Like, if there was a man with a chair stuck to himself  I would write “What the sushi!”

Rojo encouraged us to continue because “I think tween tribune is cool because you can blog on sports and more, and it can help you with writing by you become a better writer.”

Elbe suggested that ‘Tween tribune helps me with my writing because it tells me certain and specific things. It also is like a practice for writing paragraphs. I like  Tween Tribune because you can blog about your ideas on someone else’s paragraph or story.”

So should we continue reading articles and commenting on Tween Tribune? Ersa answers “I think we should continue with tween tribune because it tells us more about the world than we already know. It teaches us how to make sense and write things right.”

Therefore, we will continue our work on Tween Tribune; we can apply our writing “connected organization” strategy and “editing” requirements while we comment.  How have we improved?

Here a first comment from Ania:  “I think Bo is really cute name . He sounds like he fits the family . He is really cute. I’ve never heard of that kind of breed . I am glad that he is making Malia and Sasha happy. He sounds like a really fun playful dog . I hope he has a fun life living with them .”

Now, she writes longer, flowing paragraphs with connected sentences: “Are you kidding me, she got expelled just for wearing a skirt. I don’t agree with that because it’s just a skirt and she could have called a family member to see if they could bring her a pair of clothes. I know that if some one did that at my school they would at least have to call someone or be asked to not ever wear a skirt again, but i don’t think they would get expelled. My school has a dress code and we are not allowed to wear skirts either but sometimes people do.  No I don’t agree with the rules at my school!….”

Each student grows at his/her own pace; some learn editing, some try to write more details, and others begin to add transitions. Small steps; sharing growth; moving forward day by day. Tween Tribune helps us, don’t you think?

We can hardly wait to start our own blogs next year. In fact, we decided to start our blogs this year even though school is almost out; we blogged on topics that our class worries about. We hope you read them:

Fifth Grade: http://web.me.com/eagle_views/Writing_5/W5_Blog/W5_Blog.html

Sixth Grade: http://nativeviews.edublogs.org/

Student Bloggers

Students blog drafts on a wiki before publishing into the class blog.


What do you think about how to help students blog and comment?


Note: Student names are pseudonyms.


One thought on “Blogging: From comments to blogs

  1. Pingback: Timid to Blog? Try this: « What Else? 1DR

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