Design Thinking, postscript: the importance of the teacher

Key research, a sample student survey, and needed information about teaching boys — which of course is just great teaching strategies for all, but do we use them enough for those who need it? Read Grant Wiggins’s wise words!

Especially note these strategies for teaching boys from the research of
Christina Hoff Sommers:
” The most effective lessons included more than one of these elements:

Lessons that result in an end product–a booklet, a catapult, a poem, or a comic strip, for example.
Lessons that are structured as competitive games.
Lessons requiring motor activity.
Lessons requiring boys to assume responsibility for the learning of others.
Lessons that require boys to address open questions or unsolved problems.
Lessons that require a combination of competition and teamwork.
Lessons that focus on independent, personal discovery and realization.
Lessons that introduce drama in the form of novelty or surprise.”

Additional Notes:

The book on this subject is Reading Boys Teaching Boys Strategies  that Work — And Why by Michael Reichert and Richard Hawley

The Atlantic Article by Jessica Lahey is Stop Penalizing Boys For Not Being Able to Sit Still At School includes the excerpt in this paragraph.

Granted, and...

In my last post – widely viewed and commented on in various places – I proposed that it was a bit egocentric to think of education in terms of the teacher and the teaching since the teacher is only one element in the design. Many commenters protested that while this may be true overall, they were personally inspired and launched into a career in education by virtue of a ‘passionate’ and ‘wonderful’ teacher. Surely that’s the most important part of the equation, they argued.

I responded that to me this was a form of confirmation bias. Sure, many of us who went into teaching were moved to do so by having had inspiring teachers. But that’s a pretty small and unrepresentative sample, prone to such a bias. What about non-teachers? What about  the average student’s school experience, the people who don’t go into teaching?

Fortunately, I altered our student survey…

View original post 886 more words

2 thoughts on “Design Thinking, postscript: the importance of the teacher

  1. Pingback: Questioning… « What Else? 1DR

  2. Pingback: Questioning… | What Else

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