Musings on Innovation for #immooc

 

change

What are some examples that you consider innovative?  How is it new and better than what previously existed?

An example of a change in practice that is innovative in the classroom and becoming more so is that of the commenting feature in Google Apps so that I can give ongoing, synchronous or asynchronous, feedback to students, and they can give feedback to each other. We can have an ongoing conversation that leads the student to their success in more ways than a simple objective. With Kaizena, I can even give voice feedback, although I’ve found the written feedback to be more effective.

In addition, students can use their voice in Google Docs to type their work, which is so beneficial to some students whose great ideas somehow cannot get from their brain through their fingers onto the paper.

In the past, I’d have to gather the documents on flash drives, a shared drive, or on paper, provide written or typed feedback and send it back. Not nearly the smooth process we now have using Google Classroom with Google Docs.

In my teaching, I’m always looking for ways to help each student be successful. For instance texts on the Mac can be read to students who may not be fluent enough to read more difficult text. They know to highlight the text, click command-option-escape, and listen to the text as often as they need to understand and come up with their own questions and understanding, in their Google Doc with voice. In the past, a partner or myself could read it to them– but now they are in control. In fact my students know how to use rewordify.com to paste in text and select an easier reading level.  I’m always asking, “What does this learner need?”

In thinking about Language Arts and the tools of communication, inquiry, collaboration, design, and publication, I also understand that my goals need to represent today and tomorrow — the evolving world of interconnectedness, analysis and curation of constant information, and development and publication of one’s own ideas. Therefore, our essential questions reflect those goals:

essentialquestionsrelevantt

And our tools support our learning: Google Apps for Education, Thinglink, Padlet, blogs and blog buddies. It’s not that we’re using the tools, but how we use them as publishers, editors, designers, authors that makes us — students and teachers — innovators.

designendgoalindividual

In my life, I’m still figuring out how to innovate what was my teaching career into some other avenue. I’ve continued my Twitter conversations and connections and still participate in things like #clmooc and #immooc. I am a forever learner.

What has changed in our world is our instant connectedness, which is a good and a bad thing. So it is necessary for our student to be discerning viewers and creators of content — to do so to better the world.  That’s a mantra to keep emphasizing — to better the world. Some of us have that as a gift, others are so traumatized that survival precludes them from thinking of others. So we must share how to innovate to get beyond survival to be in control and making things better for oneself and others — to do something amazing.

IMG_0438

If I were to design a school, I’d think about these:

Design A Schoolsre.jpeg

Based on Connected Learning theory [#clmooc]:

Connected Learning

By innovating with the tools to which we have access today, much of this we can accomplish as learner-centered experiences: interest-driven, peer-supported, shared purpose, production-centered, and openly networked to meet our personalized academic goals and essential questions for learners, today and tomorrow.

architectscreateexperiences

In examining the eight characteristics of an innovator, I thought in terms of my students. How could we be innovators together?

I could ask them:  Imagine a world where you are in control, where you find creativity and contentment, passion and province, connections and community? Imagine this together. What would it look like? We can think of this journey, and prepare our minds to succeed:

Be an innovator, someone who believes that ability, intelligence, and talents are developed,leading to the creation of better ideas — a better world.

Let’s start asking ourselves these questions:

innovatorsworldsre

I started that journey with my students with collaborative tools [GAFE and wikis], blogging, and student choice for their voice in a community of learners, and now I have a way to introduce them to an innovator’s vision of and mindset for the world.

How did you start your journey?  What questions did you ask?


Images:

Change by @gcouros #immooc

Quotes created with Notegraphy

Design A School by Sheri Edwards in Keynote

Innovator’s World in Keynote

Connected Learning theory

7 thoughts on “Musings on Innovation for #immooc

  1. “How do publishers design, organize, and publish content for their audience and purpose?” Answer is honestly obvious to me: DON’T… Teachers should not rely on any content – especially from publishers!!! Don’t teach: Yield control to the students and facilitate / mentor / provide feedback for student Effective Learning.

  2. Hello John, I agree that students should be in control of and choose their learning, and the question about publishers is asking students with that control to think like a publisher as they plan the presentation and sharing of the information about their projects. Students need to think through the relevant information that fits their topic and perspective and organize it for their audience, designing [creating] the videos, charts, maps, texts, images, etc that emphasize and explain the ideas for their projects. These are complex and authentic skills using many strategies and with the multimedia and social media aspects of today’s world, students learning and using those skills will be very prepared for their futures. I hope that clears up your concerns about the question– it’s a question asked of students so they consider all the decisions and actions to take when publishing the learning of their chosen projects.

    • Thanks for the reply. Yes, I understand much better AND agree with your comments. Like the notion of students Considering like a publisher – great approach to effectively sharing one’s efforts.

  3. Love the visuals here, Sheri. And the connection to Connected Learning principles (which won’t surprise you in the least). The Innovator’s World chart is a nice way to gather up important questions … Thanks
    Kevin

    • Thanks. When I started to write about the vision of a school, Connected Learning just flowed out — it’s so powerful. As for the chart, I wanted something that could be used with kids as well– to bring them into and create a quality world of learning [reference to work of William Glasser]

  4. Pingback: Connected Educator Month #ce16 | 1DR What Else?

  5. Pingback: Connected Educator Month #ce16 #immooc | 1DR What Else?

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