Slice of Life: Road Trip


The day was rainy. 
Cloudy. 

Dark. 

Cold. 

And it was Sunday. 

It’s supposed to be sunny on a Sunday in spring.

The only thing to do is to hop in the car and find that sunshine.

Amazingly, we discovered some sun a few miles down the road with a waterfall blown backwards by the wind.


The many rainstorms this spring resulted in flooding in fields and roads and flowing off the edge of the grand coulee. We found some of those flooded roads:


This is the creek flowing by a small town, where some if it is drying up now:


In the small towns dotting State Highway 21, we discovered a hidden sculpture:


A unique hotel


a truck museum

A view of the big sky over sagebrush, a lake, the forest, and wheat fields— all in one view:


And the sun!


Hurray!  The sun!

Fifty Days of Sketching

Fifty Days of Sketching with #Sketch50 from sketch50.org

Follow my own “growth mindset” as I accept a sketching challenge to improve my art and my message.

Thank you to all Sketch50 creators and participants for learning with me. By sharing our work, we learned from each other.

Thank you authors for the awesome prompts and badges.

Had such fun learning and creating– while learning more each day. From basic shapes to lettering and stick people, improving these skills gives me more confidence to do more. We even were encouraged to try animation. I used both DoInk and Sketchbook Motion.

Want to try: Just join in now at sketch50.org and start your challenge today!

My Flickr Sketch50 Album:

https://flickr.com/photos/35786276@N08/sets/72157682006086766

Sketch50 Music SRE

 

This #sketch50 inspired me to try another animation. I drew the image in Sketchbook Pro and exported it  to  import into Sketchbook Motion.  I exported just the large heart next to add into Motion to animate as “Music lifts our hearts.”

 

I also learned how to save it as a gif in iCloud to import into wordpress. 🙂

Image

Shoot for the moon…

Shoot4theMoon.gif

Animation is a big thing, and I’ve stayed away from it. I’m not an artist, so simple sketches are a difficult.

Sketch50 [sketch50.org] has helped; I’ve improved, so I thought I’d try animation.

Today I worked with Sketchbook Motion — it’s got a lot of fun features as you can see in the gif. I can make a path, grow more parts [not shown], create particles [stars].  I couldn’t see how to adjust the timeline of events, but there’s a lot more to learn. It works in layers similar to the Sketchbook Pro app I’ve been learning for drawing.

Who knows what’s next in the visual world, but animation to express ideas is a big deal now. I worry, though, that too much may be left to the reader who may misinterpret the writer’s meaning if the voice of the writer in text is missing.

I’m also trying Doink, which has many tutorials to help get started. Here’s my first:


As you see, I’m shooting for the moon and might land on a few stars to help me learn.

Slice of Life Nutty Nerds

1280px-Cashew_apples

Have you any idea what the dangling fruit here is?

Can you believe that the largest of these trees covers  8,400 square metres (2.1 acres)!

Maior_Cajueiro_do_Mundo_2011

Is that amazing? It’s huge!

Last Thursday, my husband and I ventured out on the highway to visit our grandchildren who live over the Cascade Mountains on the west side of Washington State. It’s about a four hour drive, depending on weather and traffic patterns.

It is a beautiful drive over the mountains, and we spend the time talking or listening to music, podcasts, or books — sometimes listening and discussing the audio ideas together, and sometimes sharing what each has learned.

As I enjoyed the passing blooming orchards around Wenatchee, I opened a can of mixed nuts to munch on. I shook the can so the brazil nuts and almonds sorted themselves out onto the top. I’m lucky; those are my favorite. Thank physics for that sorting by shaking:

The primary mechanisms at work in the Brazil Nut Effect are percolation—in which small grains migrate down to the bottom of the pile between larger grains—and convection, in which larger grains push up toward the top of the pile.

The Brazil Nut Effect Is More Complicated Than You Think

But as I stared into that can of nuts, I asked Scott, “Have you ever cracked a cashew nut?”

We both thought about that– we’ve purchased nuts in the shell many times– almonds, walnuts, pecans, brazil nuts, peanuts, hazelnuts. We could picture the many types of shells for these nuts, but not cashews.

Why not? Well, as nutty nerds who often stop an historical movie to Google the history of the era we’re watching, we googled, cashew.

And that top photo is the fruit of the cashew tree. You see the cashew nut dangling from the bottom of and outside the cashew apple. The yellow apple part has such delicate skin that it can’t be transported. And the dark shell of the nut causes some people to break out with dermatitis.  That’s why we never see cashews in the shell!

Its English name derives from the Portuguese name for the fruit of the cashew tree caju (Portuguese pronunciation: [kaˈʒu]), which itself is derived from the Tupian word acajú, literally meaning “nut that produces itself”.[1] The generic name Anacardium, originally from the Greek, refers to the unusual location of the seed outside the core or heart of the fruit (ana- means “again” or “backward” and -cardium means “heart”).

Cashew in Wikipedia

View more of the largest cashew tree here, at Wikipedia; it is found in Parnamirim, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil). Brazil is the native origin of the cashew nut.

So, for fun, share the picture of the cashew apple in your family chat. Ask them, “What is this?” My favorite guess from our family is “poisonous apples from the Evil Queen with enchanted magic mushrooms in them.”

No one knew, but now they do!

Next time you crunch a cashew, you’ll be able to share your new knowledge.

Enjoy!

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Cashew Photo: CC BY-SA 3.0 by Abhishek JacobOwn work Cashew Apples

Cashew Tree Photo: CC BY 2.0 by Mateussf -Maior Cajueiro do Mundo 2011

Biggest Cashew-tree in the world, located in Parnamirim, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil)

Tinkering With Voices in Poetry

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Illustration by Melvina Kurashige

Tinkering, playing around, experimenting: that’s learning. So when Kevin Hodgson [@dogtrax] read my “On Starting: A Poem for Three Voices,” he suggested recording those three voices in a podcast.

Kevin invited Melvina Kurashige [@mkurashige] and me to an online, collaborative sound recording tool called SoundTrap [there’s an app too.] With just a few tests and his great Google doc tutorial, we each recorded the voices for the poem. Melvina created the illustration [above] and Kevin added music and transferred the recording to SoundCloud.

 

I wanted to create an animation, but I did manage to create an illustrated version of our poem by drawing illustrations in SketchBook and importing them into iMovie. I downloaded the SoundCloud version and matched the timing of the recording to the images. I added in Melvina’s illustration and, of course, the credits.

On Starting on YouTube    On Starting at Soundcloud

 

I was impressed with how easy SoundTrap is use; a collaboration with students would work with a light learning curve. Imagine students creating their own poems for two voices, or creating a podcast for the school. See the SoundTrap Edublogs for more about an education edition. To get a feel for how to use it, check out their Tutorials at Vimeo.

I’d like to thank Kevin for making it happen — he wrote about it here: “Tinkering with Voices/Playing with Poems” — and to Melvina for accepting the invitation and taking the initiative to create the SketchNote of the poem.

Now, go tryout SoundTrap [there’s an app too.] in the free version to see its versatility, and then… share what you do with it! Really, you’ll have a blast.

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Illustration by Melvina Kurashige