SOL17 DoodleaDay 30 Tools and Spaces

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Doodling is writing in images. The flow for each is similar: idea-draft-share-elaborate-revise-share-enhance-edit-publish. And publishing can be private, shared with a few, public on websites, social media, blogs, journals, etc.

For me, and again like writing, I prefer the digital. The ability to cut/paste/re-order/undo/redo just makes the process of thinking through the challenge to create the best message is just such a gift. This is especially important with art– because I’m not an artist. I’d be crunching up paper and eventually be buried in snowballs of wrecked work. I’d be frustrated and quit. But with the digital, I try over and over and feel like I can improve and understand better what each stroke, brush, line does to bring out the image. It’s fun.

I think that’s important to understand for students in writing class: why drearily write by hand when the words are so easily created, ordered, deleted, enhanced with the tools available in digital format? Handwriting? That’s now art! Make it fun, on paper or digital.

The #Sketch50 theme this week is Communication, and today’s topic is page/book/device. Notice what changed from the #doodleaday of “Tools and Spaces:

sketch50_page.book.device.sre

First of all, you can see that I just needed to copy the #doodleaday to my Sketch50 journal in Paper53. To make the icons I just searched Google [icon Blogger, for example]. Then I could zoom in and create an image pretty close to the icon of  the app that I use for communication of ideas.

Sharing Google Docs, in blogs, on Twitter, in Evernote, through presentations [Keynote or Slides]– those are ways for me to curate ideas and collaborate.

And the information is from my experiences, my books [Kindle], news apps, research in Google Search.

I do have a journal, which I hardly use, and Staedtler fine point pens, for the occasional sketching I do for a quick idea– rare. I also do a little ZenTangle art, but mostly in my Paper53 and Autodesk Sketchbook apps. My pens last a long time.

But whatever writing I do — text or image – I just think, get an idea, and then dive in, digitally.

I visited school yesterday. Actually, I was the substitute Principal. It was a wonderful experience– I could see the flow of the day, and found smiles on student faces, which means the school is doing well for kids. I wrote on paper [!] a log of what I did. I wrote “Tootles”– oodles of them in each classroom I visited. Tootles are acknowledgements of students who are models of goodness: Good thinking, good questions, good answers, good effort, good attitude– each is written specifically for and given to one child. I was able to hear good questions, acknowledge a change in attitude, a willingness to listen again and correct mistakes, etc. It was awesome.

I was also reminded of the challenge in writing — the biggest challenge– the start. That first word or image. That blank paper or screen. In my experience, the best way to overcome that obstacle is three-fold:

  1. Model examples [if needed, non-examples as well]
  2. Model and try with students; Share and find the positive.
  3. Conversation: discuss the trials and encourage discussion of what the examples suggest– what else could have been tried or done or reworded?

I found that modeling, guiding a reworking or new ideas, and then having conversations with students, and students with each other, gets them thinking about their own ideas and experiences. Soon, one by one, each student is able to start.

If you are new to teaching writing, I’ve always recommended these:

Ralph Fletcher Books

Lessons for the Writers Notebook and Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi by Heinemann

In the Middle by Nancie Atwell

Vicki Spandel Six Traits

Six Trait Writing by Northwest Labs

Teaching that Makes Sense by Steve Peha

If you are a writer, what is your flow? Are you digital or paper?

If you are a teacher, what strategies do you suggest for helping students start?

If you are a teacher, what resources do you recommend?

We all need tools and spaces, and once we help each other consider the possibilities– starting  is not an issue.

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A Poem for Three Writing Voices: On Starting

Stuck.

Blank.

[Sigh]

“What?”

“Nothing – You?”

“Look – whale’s tales”

“Whales tales?”

“I couldn’t draw

the whole whale.”

“Me too.

I drew my dog

in the  wheat field.

Just the head.”

“Oh.”

“Yeah!”

“That works!”

“Yeah, that works.”

“Oh.”

“I know.”

“What?”

“What?”

“It’s a square.”

“It’s my cat in a box.”

“Now I can write.”

“Yeah–we looked

for that cat

for an hour!”

“I know.”

“How to Find a Cat”

“That works!”

“That does work.”

“Shhhh.”

“I’m writing.”

 

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Doodling Song

I was going to listen to “We’ve Got the Whole World In Our Hands,” but then I stumbled on the same song, remixed for Earth Day: Official Music Video for one of DARIA’s Earth Day CD songs: We’ve Got The Whole World In Our Hands.

It’s got some great images — I imagine a class set of doodles / sketches could be used to create a similar version.

 

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Tools and Spaces

Part of Sketch50: page/book/device

 

SOL17 DoodleaDay Map Story


Writing.

If you’re a writer, you know it isn’t easy. If you’re not a writer, you know it’s hard.

Donald Murray assured us that “Writing is hard fun.”

In our classrooms, as students learn and read, and wherever students are, they listen, watch, play, work and learn. They gather ideas and facts; they imagine “what ifs.” And teachers have a responsibility to extend all that learning by providing time for students to think and write, and think and write together. And writing for their personal expression in fact and fiction to share their ideas.

Writing clarifies our ideas; it frees our thoughts, contains our thoughts, and connects our thoughts in new ways. We get better at writing by reading a lot and writing a lot. We get better at writing by sharing our pieces — what we like, what we wonder, what we are confused about– for feedback from others. 

Writers know this. Our students need to experience this, not in assignments, but in writing about what’s important to them, in fact or fiction. Journaling, blogging, writers workshop, genius hour: all are ways to incorporate choice in student writing.

We’ve got to let them develop their style, away from templates and outlines. Students need to experience using what they know– facts, experiences, imaginings– to form ideas into a story [fiction or not]. As students review their writing, they share with a friend and get feedback as they make a choice to abandon or to elaborate and revise. If they like their piece, they can edit and publish.  Without these experiences, the feeling of satisfaction and joy — that hard fun — is not attained. We want students to live as writers, as authors on their own.

And with that experience, their messages become clear, in both their own and in their assignments.

Yes, I want my students think like authors– to make the choices in words and organization, in flow and structure, to build their factual or imaginary story and feel the message understood by others when they share during writing and later in publication. 

I want them to learn through their process and publication that “Writing is hard fun.”

And just perhaps, they’ll compose such a story as…

The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Gordon Lightfoot

Today’s doodling tune in honor of writers and writing, in all its forms.

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Hiding in our minds

Ideas flow and connect;

Stories Awaken.

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers
Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Maps

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Update: As I perused my Facebook feed, I discovered that Ralph Fletcher just made a similar plea, but, of course, he says it much better than I:

Greenbelt Writing: How Low-Stakes, Student-Centered Writing Supports Bold Learning

It’s a great read on Heinemann’s Medium blog.

SOL17 DoodleaDay 25 Triumph


How does a person shake out of a slump?

In January, I set goals which I didn’t meet, although I tried. I had challenges and ideas, but they did not inspire me as I’d hoped. Too much going on in the news, too much to consider and worry about. 

Then, DoodleaDay by Royan Lee started in March.  Listen to a song, and doodle. Wow. I could do that. And, the March Slice of Life challenge started — a doodle with a song and a slice from life: a refocus that starts with art.

I’m not an artist, my lines are never straight, and what’s perspective? But doodling? I could doodle. And the first few doodle prompts provided some tips. And in researching [of course, I had to research…], I discovered zentangle doodling. 

It also reminded me of my classroom.  The last fifteen years has seen an emphasis on one standardized test and its scores, which refocused all work by teachers and students to reading, writing, and math. So much was eliminated: art, music, even social studies and science. But kids can’t focus on just those– learning isn’t just skills. Learning is thinking and doing and connections and reflections. So one thing I did was to bring in art, and to take art breaks. Just simple things, like draw five dots, then create an action figure from those five dots:


Or Scribble Art: draw a line, and make some thing of it:


Or small art: Give everyone a one inch square and a topic. Mount the results on black paper and hang. [I have a picture somewhere…]


These didn’t take much time, but ah the sound of joy and relief in the classroom. The sound of sharing and chuckles and success. Art is the human story in shapes; art centers us; art gives expression to our feelings and hopes.

So, in the classroom, our schedules and impromptu art sessions helped build our relationships with each other and improve our classroom climate; art rounded out the mandates and made us whole. 

And that’s what Royan Lee’s DoodleaDay did for me!  Thank you, Royan Lee!

Shake out the slump with art!

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Resource on Art in Education: Commensense: Art in ELL Classroom

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If you’re down, and your smile can’t be 

Found;

If you’re sad, and your mind needs some

Glad;

Give a sigh, and grab a pen, close your

Eyes;

Make a squiggle, add some spark ’til you

Giggle.

Make a start, find yourself, find your glad in

Art.

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers
Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: triumph and failure

Doodle Prompts March 21-31

Doodling Song: Bellamy Brothers: Let Your Love Flow

SOL17 DoodleaDay 22 Emoji


Did you know that one in eleven people in the United States is diabetic? And that it is the seventh leading cause of death? Find out more here, an American Diabetes Association info graphic based on data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC].

That’s a lot of people, and you can protect yourself if you are prediabetic with regular excercise and by eating a diet filled with green vegetables and protein, with a limit on complex carbohydrates while cutting out simple carbohydrates. Of course, it’s more complex than that, but it is a lifestyle that would benefit almost everyone. Here’s the info from the CDC to follow to help learn more to help yourself.

I found myself in the hospital emergency room last April, and found the diagnosis of diabetes 2.  My new lifestyle began based on this information from the CDC. It’s actually pretty easy for me: I haven’t had a soda or diet soda since that day! I quit simple carbohydrates and began eating nuts, especially walnuts. And broccoli, broccoli, broccoli, which I still love. I’ve learned how to balance my meals with this type of plate:

I listened to and followed the directions of my doctor and nutritionist, and I subscribe to a newsletter at Everyday Health, which I found in one of the pamphlets from the hospital. Here’s a great article on sugar and inflammation, an important read– and why cutting that junk food and simple carbohydrates is important.

Fortunately, I have health insurance– but how long will that last, and how affordable will it be now that the GOP plan to gut health care? While I am not a recipient of ACA health care due to my former employment as teacher, anything that changes the health care system and Medicare will affect my coverage — and yours.

So we’ve been eating and exercising to keep my A1C score at 6%. If I’m eating at other people’s houses or an event, I eat something first — just in case what is served is filled with carbohydrates that would set my system wacky. And I’ve found that most restaurants serve chicken Caesar salads, which is my standby. If I must eat fast food — I eat chicken without the white bread and fries. I’ve found Applebees to be a diabetic friendly menu [but they do change up their menu]. I love the pork chop, sweet potato, broccoli meal. It’s delicious. I also carry walnuts and carrots in the car for traveling.

Which brings me to the Doodle for #DoodleaDay today: an emoji I wish for:

I searched for Diabetes emojis, and there are some — but for my phone and for menus, I’d like one that points to diabetes friendly meals– no simple carbohydrates, but green vegetables and protein. I could add it to a map with diabetes friendly meals.  Hmmm. That’s an idea. With twenty-five percent of seniors being diabetic, I think the emoji and the map is a good idea. 🙂

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Stay happy,

Laugh;

Eat healthy,

Live;

Hug always,

Love.

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Now, a word about emojis in general. I find them confusing because they are open to interpretation — I’d rather hear or see the words. And my students laughed so hard when I thought the pile of poop was chocolate ice cream.  And parents, they’ve got to know, as this article shows exactly what teens are saying through emojis– or what adults think they might be saying, but don’t: Time: emoji-meaning.

So, here I go with carrots and walnuts and “Sky Between the Branches” tea.


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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Draw an emoji you want for you phone

Doodling Song by BREAD, David Gates: If

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SOL17 DoodleaDay 9 Hope

Today is March 9th, a rainy day turning into a foggy evening, but filled with hope because my PLN friend Denise Krebs tweeted this:

The article by Abby Brockman in Medium [https://goo.gl/KkMwQG], Despair is Not a Strategy: 15 Principles of Hope, reminds us of the process of change towards a better world of justice through nonviolent actions. The small moments joined together keep the issues focused in the forefront for those who need to hear. My doodle is a sketchnote of my connection to each principle in the article while listening to Raffi’s Turn This World Around.

I’ve been writing daily to clarify answers to understand the change to make America greedy again: we need to turn this world around for the children. Through my interactions with my PLN, and building more connections, hope is everywhere — look for the bursts, the positives, and the actions each of us can take in our corner of the world. Every small act matters: postcards, phone calls, connections, votes, meetings, conversations, sharing on social media. 

I hope you take heart in the hope from Abby’s message.

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Hope

A dream of better

With knowledge to reach it

The friends who join

The journey and detours

That hold back ’til a burst forward

To a dream of better

Hope

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Lightbulb Connectivity

While doodling I listened to Raffi’s Turn This World Around.

SOL17 DoodleaDay 7 Inner Critic

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How do you overcome your inner critic?

#DoodleaDay is helping me have that conversation — the one in the above doodle. It’s so common, isn’t it? Especially if you’re just starting a project of any kind. For me it was starting blogging, and then to keep up with blogging.

And now it is doodling– I doodle in lines and squiggles; I’m not an artist, but I think this doodling daily is improving that, along with overcoming my blogging arguments.

So my advice to myself and my readers is to to keep trying — and like that last part on the doodle:

we learn when we read and watch what others do,

so acknowledge those who went before

by honoring them with your take

on what was learned from them,

and share so others learn too.

Just go where your heart takes you and share it–

As sharing like this makes the world great!

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Places I’ve learned:

Resources to Start Blogging:

The Fear of Sharing by George Couros 

A Series of blog posts on blogging by George Couros

Why Educators Blog: A series by Sue Waters from Edublogs.org Scroll down for more posts

A JumpStart in Technology Class by Jennifer Gonzalez [I’ve take it; it’s awesome- my work here]

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haiku sol17 blossoms hail.001.jpeg

Ideas blossom

Doubt hails to destroy, yet melts

to open thought’s bud.

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This post is:

Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today:  Inner Critic Conversation

My Doodling song — one of my very favorites:

Title Song from Star Trek Enterprise: Where My Heart Will Take Me (Faith of the Heart) originally written by Diane Warren, reworked by Dennis McCarthy for Star Trek Enterprise and sung by Russell Watson.

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Doodle by Sheri Edwards

Blossom image and poetry by Sheri Edwards