Slice of Life Cats

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In the morning, the cats are antsy. They don’t want us to leave. The black and white one meows incessantly, following my husband around where ever he wanders: starting the coffee pot, cutting the vegetables and fruit for our morning smoothie, fetching the paper. Stella follows around talking the whole time, sometimes running through his feet almost tripping him.

Our other cat, a tabby named Abby, watches the whole display and waits at the back slider, hoping to wander outside to check the messages the neighborhood cats have left, yet quickly ready to dart back inside if any of them are actually in our yard.

We deeply miss having our white lab Pooka around to chase away wandering neighborhood cats, especially Bad Cat, a ferrel black one with specks of grey, torn ears, scars, and one bad eye. Bad Cat terrorizes every one, and has survived the hottest and coldest of weather for probably five years now.  Neighbors have tried to trap him; others have scared him away with pellet guns. But that Bad Cat just keeps tramping through his neighborhood territory.

And, as I step outside this morning, there is the neighbor’s cat, Thunder: black as night and most definitely the spawn of Bad Cat. I leave the antics of my own cats to be greeted by the patiently waiting [and very soft] Thunder. I had to take a picture and pause to pet him before leaving as he sits on the steps waiting for attention.

Cats. They’re just there to help us slow down and enjoy small moments, because we don’t have nine lives.

classroomsliceoflife


 

Writing Strategies

Strong verb forms: meows, following, cutting, fetching, watches, wats, waner, dart, chase, survived trap, scared, tramping

Description: a ferrel black one with specks of grey, torn ears, scars, and one bad eye.

Assonance:  tabby named Abby

Alliteration: [p] take a picture and pause to pet him

Slice of Life The Cow

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As I drove by a field with fresh greenery spreading out for miles, I glanced at the fenced-in area on hillside below the road. It was filled with white cows, not the usual “dairy cows” of black and white [above] but white cows and brown cows, all munching and moseying at their slow and gentle pace.

 

Two white cows were separated by a large basalt boulder, a haystack rock the size of a large dump trpublic domain800px-Yeager-Rock-Erractic-PB110039uck that was dropped by a glacier twenty thousand plus years ago.

I slowed down to see the cow behind the rock lift its head to as if moo-ing.

The cow on my side of the rock looked at the boulder as if to say, “I hear you. Are you there, somewhere?”

The first cow repeated, and as I passed by above them, the cow near me seemed to twist its head as if learning that mystery of knowing something is there though it can’t be seen. Its brown eyes staring, questioning.

Learning. Knowing about the world. Even cows learn.


Writing Strategies

Description [sights]  field with fresh greenery spreading out for miles,

Alliteration: munching and moseying

 


 

Images: Public Domain

 

 

 

 

SOL Lemons

 

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life lemons

Today, our prompt was to think of a quote and connect with it, something that touched your life.

This one is so old, but it always pops up and squirts a reminder to move on.  I first remember it in a history class in college. The professor always had a ten minute discussion about dealing with life and making the world better. Those conversations were enlightening. My family didn’t talk much about the big ideas, and I enjoyed learning about other people’s views.  And I like things pleasant.

So, when life sings a sour note, and creates a bit of drama or chaos or sadness, this silly old quote reminds me to find a way to make it work.  I remember Barbara Coloroso suggesting that we help students see that “there is no problem so great that we can’t find a solution,” or a way to deal with it.

And that’s an important message for students. Keep the ideas; find a way to make it work; don’t throw it out or crumple it up.  If you need help, we have counselors and adults to help deal with the issues that tear at your heart, pulling at it until everything aches; let some one know.  Then let us help you move forward.  It’s not easy. But drinking lemonade is easier than that letting those sour feelings create continuous heartache.

What quote helps you deal with difficulties?

classroomsliceoflife

Writing Strategies:

Emotions: issues that tear at your heart, pulling at it until everything aches;

Details: remember it in a history class in college. The professor always had a ten minute discussion about dealing with life and making the world better.

Descriptions: pops up and squirts a reminder to move on; when life sings a sour note

Consonance / Alliteration: deal with difficulties