SOL17 DoodleaDay 22 Emoji


Did you know that one in eleven people in the United States is diabetic? And that it is the seventh leading cause of death? Find out more here, an American Diabetes Association info graphic based on data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC].

That’s a lot of people, and you can protect yourself if you are prediabetic with regular excercise and by eating a diet filled with green vegetables and protein, with a limit on complex carbohydrates while cutting out simple carbohydrates. Of course, it’s more complex than that, but it is a lifestyle that would benefit almost everyone. Here’s the info from the CDC to follow to help learn more to help yourself.

I found myself in the hospital emergency room last April, and found the diagnosis of diabetes 2.  My new lifestyle began based on this information from the CDC. It’s actually pretty easy for me: I haven’t had a soda or diet soda since that day! I quit simple carbohydrates and began eating nuts, especially walnuts. And broccoli, broccoli, broccoli, which I still love. I’ve learned how to balance my meals with this type of plate:

I listened to and followed the directions of my doctor and nutritionist, and I subscribe to a newsletter at Everyday Health, which I found in one of the pamphlets from the hospital. Here’s a great article on sugar and inflammation, an important read– and why cutting that junk food and simple carbohydrates is important.

Fortunately, I have health insurance– but how long will that last, and how affordable will it be now that the GOP plan to gut health care? While I am not a recipient of ACA health care due to my former employment as teacher, anything that changes the health care system and Medicare will affect my coverage — and yours.

So we’ve been eating and exercising to keep my A1C score at 6%. If I’m eating at other people’s houses or an event, I eat something first — just in case what is served is filled with carbohydrates that would set my system wacky. And I’ve found that most restaurants serve chicken Caesar salads, which is my standby. If I must eat fast food — I eat chicken without the white bread and fries. I’ve found Applebees to be a diabetic friendly menu [but they do change up their menu]. I love the pork chop, sweet potato, broccoli meal. It’s delicious. I also carry walnuts and carrots in the car for traveling.

Which brings me to the Doodle for #DoodleaDay today: an emoji I wish for:

I searched for Diabetes emojis, and there are some — but for my phone and for menus, I’d like one that points to diabetes friendly meals– no simple carbohydrates, but green vegetables and protein. I could add it to a map with diabetes friendly meals.  Hmmm. That’s an idea. With twenty-five percent of seniors being diabetic, I think the emoji and the map is a good idea. 🙂

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Stay happy,

Laugh;

Eat healthy,

Live;

Hug always,

Love.

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Now, a word about emojis in general. I find them confusing because they are open to interpretation — I’d rather hear or see the words. And my students laughed so hard when I thought the pile of poop was chocolate ice cream.  And parents, they’ve got to know, as this article shows exactly what teens are saying through emojis– or what adults think they might be saying, but don’t: Time: emoji-meaning.

So, here I go with carrots and walnuts and “Sky Between the Branches” tea.


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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Draw an emoji you want for you phone

Doodling Song by BREAD, David Gates: If

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SOL17 WorldPoetryDay 3.22 Spine Poetry America


Spine Poetry America

For #WorldHistoryDay 3.22.17

The Crisis:

The Greatest Show on Earth!

A Brief History of Time

Castles From the Air;

Founding Father

Letters of a Nation–

Shadows of Meaning

Frames of Mind

(Forgotten Tales)

*Developing More Curious Minds

*The Good Heart:

Speak-

Active Voice!

“A is for America!”

…Let the Circle Be Unbroken…

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Writing. It clarifies. It calms. It calls. 

I continue my journey to understand the coup that has happened in America, destroying to the Western World’s amazement: democracy. Yes, we are a democratic republic, but the President of the United States is gathering his powers -against “others” by spreading fear and -against democracy by organizing all power within the White House, a model after the President’s hero: Putin [and guided by Bannon, Miller]. That is how I see it, and I am caught in a sense of disbelief. 

I know I join many, many of my educated friends in this sad call of thoughts we share through writing.

While reading poetry under the #WorldPoetryDay hashtag, many were of the same mind, but angry. I saw many others sharing hope and humor. One included spine poetry– taking the spine of book titles in an order for a poem. That inspired me to do the same as another way to express my hope that the tales of our founding fathers, of whom we seem to have forgotten in this show of American politics, will be a circle unbroken: that our people, our elected officials, and our Constitution will prevail, unbroken since the 1776 dream in America began.

What do you think? How do you cope with the ongoing crisis?
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Part of Slice of Life 17

Image: Flickr by Sheri Edwards teach.eagle 

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Update: I’ve already received an answer from my PLN, Scott Glass, and it’s prefect: Develop Good Heart, Active Voice.

Thanks Scott!   Absolutely “made my day!” 

SOL17 DoodleaDay 15 Blowin’ In The Wind

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I spend time each day to learn from others by reading their ideas linked to in tweets on Twitter. Before November 8th, this daily activity inspired me and my work; the twitter feed offered the opportunity to share, learn, grow, reciprocate, and remix to make the world a better place.

After November 8th, I took some time off. I found the world had shifted off the humane course of a world seeking peace– seeking liberty and justice for all. It careened of a cliff and away from but a call to:

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

~Declaration of Independence, written by Thomas Jefferson

I don’t know if you felt it, that tremble under your feet that knocks you off balance; a feeling of dread that the world beneath your feet is crumbling away. Before November 8th, our country opened up that joyous word: freedom — it acknowledged and upheld differences; it celebrated a world that includes everyone. Yes, places in the world were still horrific, and the world was trying to help that. Yes, sometimes the opportunities were not available as easily for some than others. Yet, we were as a country working on those. We were not perfect, but we were open; we had avenues to take to promote freedom and justice for all.

Then we elected oligarchs, white supremacists, anarchists, illiterates whose sole purpose is to disrupt and control.

I thought that the Republicans were American patriots — that they would see the evil in the actions and the power negating freedoms, but now they are complicit.

I am a fool; I thought our government of the people, by the people, and for the people through our elected representatives would govern for all the people.

I am a fool.

Today, I looked at the blogs of people I follow on Twitter. One post, My Un-Representative by Alan Levine [@cogdog] really hit my heart- the ideas touched exactly how I’m feeling.

Look at the graphic at the top of the post — this is a Wikimedia Commons public domain image representing the House of Representatives, 2017.

houseofrepresentatives2017_publicdomain.jpg

There are, indeed, more Republicans [red] than Democrats and others [blue].

Yes, we elected them, but how did we elect them? In fact, the Republicans selected us, the voters by rigging the voting districts. It’s called gerrymandering, and this January, 2016 Washington Post article explains this concept and this fact [bold, mine]:

The GOP scored 33 more seats in the House this election even though Democrats earned a million more votes in House races. Professor Jeremy Mayer says gerrymandering distorts democracy. (The Fold/The Washington Post)

I knew gerrymandering existed, but did not think it was that bad, and in fact, I thought my state [Washington] was fair with a bi-partisan system. It turns out I’m wrong: Read the DailyKos article on why this doesn’t work either.

Some resources to correct the effects of gerrymandering:

End Gerrymandering

The Fold/The Washington Post

Brennan Center for Justice

FairVote

Still, despite knowing about gerrymandering, I’m still a fool. Because although there are more red than blue representatives and senators, I believed they represented ALL the people, not just their party.

Yes, I thought the people elected still had to be Americans and consider all Americans in their elected responsibility as my representative in the House or Senate.

freedom_iconsre Yes, I believe in our freedoms, our rights, and the freedom to live one’s life in one’s own way.

That means that our representatives need to consider all the people, to hold up those rights for all Americans. In the past, we have expected our rights to extend to anyone in our country. But that was then, now we have the inhumane, unAmerican travel ban.

Since we all live with others, freedom comes with responsibilities. One of those is to respect the freedoms and ideas of others, which I certainly expect my congresspersons to do.

respect_iconsre

Respect means listening to and accepting other ideas, tolerating that which is different, and acknowledging ways to allow those differing ideas a voice and a life in our complex and dynamic communities. I expect this of our elected officials in Congress.

In my classroom, it means we have a talking stick, a Native American way to hand off a time to share and give one’s voice [and everyone has a  voice to solve an issue].

compromise_iconsre

Another responsibility key to our democracy is compromise. We find common ground so that our country of diverse ideas and cultures can live together in peace and respect. I expect that elected officials work together to compromise so all people are represented, not just the elected person’s party.

And in my classroom, sometimes we compromise on how we spend our  time– some students want more time with the teacher and others want to work in their own small groups. I shorten up my part, and then students set their goals and work in the areas and ways that best help them succeed in their projects.

cooperation_iconsre

In order to compromise, listening and understanding respectfully is a must and so is cooperation. I expect that when a law is created, that bi-partisan cooperation takes precedence over party political manipulation.

In my classroom, students and I cooperate– giving each other ideas and feedback on our writing or videos or blogposts. We help each other be successful.

collaboration_iconsre

Sometimes issues are so complicated, that we need to collaborate to get things done — the people we elect need to research and present different ideas to each other in order to analyze what would work best to solve the issue in cooperation and compromise.

In the classroom, sometimes students have different jobs [researcher, interviewer, composer] and sometimes they have parts of topics for which they are responsible for so when their team meets, everyone has part of the information needed to complete a project. That’s collaboration, which then requires cooperation and compromise respectfully to consider and solve the big picture issue.

doodleaday_iconssre_freedomI know these concepts: freedom, respect, compromise, cooperation, and collaboration work together — and I know that they work because that’s how things happen in  the real world.

So I’m expecting the elected officials, Democrat, Republican, Independents, work together for all Americans, and not just for their party.

How about you?

Look for and support those officials who seek each other out and begin the listening process to uphold the Constitution and our American values which are now under siege by the current and very lost administration. Help them find the way back to the great America, the one that fought for and created laws — not for order — but for liberty and justice for all.

The answer is blowing’ in the wind — and we must listen in freedom for all to find the answers together.

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Maybe just you can,

Maybe you say,

Maybe you shut me up,

Maybe you pray your way.

Maybe you slam the door

Maybe you build a border

Maybe you block me out

Maybe you hear my shouts.

Maybe I stand louder

Maybe you can’t ignore

Maybe in the crying

Maybe you’ll feel your heart.

Maybe you’ll open up,

Maybe you’ll listen,

Maybe you’ll see the person

Maybe you’ll step up.

Maybe you’ll open a window,

Maybe you’ll open a door,

Maybe you’ll take my hand,

Maybe together we stand.

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: icons: metaphors for concepts

Doodling Song: Peter, Paul, and Mary Blowin’ in the Wind

House of Representatives 2017 Image: “United States House of Representatives 2017” is a Wikimedia Commons image place in the public domain.

sol17 DoodleaDay 5 DigiLit Sunday

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Today is Sunday. It’s great for two reasons: Margaret Gibson’s DigiLit Sunday and it’s the best day of the week for me. And today’s DigiLit Sunday is about Slice of Life, a March writing challenge by the The Two Writing Teachers that asks us to write every day in March about a slice of our lives, a moment in time.

So today I ask you to join in the writing, to write, because it is “hard fun,” as Donald Murray shares, and because writing clears and clarifies the mind. And in these challenging times, we need that. Won’t you join?

I love Sundays. For most of our Sundays together, my husband and I enjoy the light of day shining through the window as we sip our coffee, his black and mine with cream. We spend hours reading and conversing on any topic: news, politics, history, nature, discoveries old and new, how things work, philosophy. It’s relaxing and freeing to have no hurry pushing us.

morning-coffe

Not only does Scott brew the coffee, he also makes breakfast: eggs, many ways. So the day is extra special for me.

In years past, we had hopped in the car to visit grandkids two hours away — but they do grow up 🙂 so we do that less.

Many times, during the school year, I would spend the afternoon and evening on planning for my next week as middle school teacher. But now, I’m retired. Note to teachers: take the day off; your time is precious. [Not that I regret it– I loved it, but teachers shouldn’t have to work so many hours.]

Most of the time we take a walk or hike around town or around the hills of our little rural town.

deer_in_park

Mule Deer in the credit union field

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Coulee Art [and yes, we probably know who did this]

Many of my nature photos come from these walks [which we now take almost daily]. This Sunday, these fall leftovers still shared their colors:

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Oregon Grape

oak_leaf.JPG

Oak Leaf [not native to our area, but planted in the park]

Other times we hop in the car for that traditional pastime from both our childhoods: the Sunday drive. Today we drove along Banks Lake, which is still mostly frozen over from the cold winter.

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Banks Lake in the Grand Coulee [an irrigation reservoir with year round fishing]

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Steamboat  Rock [history]

Banks Lake is surrounded by the Grand Coulee walls. [See Glacial Lake Missoula history]

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Moon over Coulee Wall

Following the highway we turned off at Dry Falls, the largest ever waterfall, but created during the Ice Ages.

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Dry Falls State Park [part of Glacial Lake Missoula history]

That lake is 350 ft below viewing area!

There we turned around and headed the long way home around through the plateau wheat fields around Hartline, Almira, and Wilbur. We detoured to Govan to take this picture of what’s left of a one-room school house:

school_house_govan.jpg

Govan School House at Sunset

Sundays are a Slice of Life each week. My walks are a Slice of Life each day. In these days of darkness with a totalitarian leaning president, be sure to take care of yourself. In everyone’s life, to celebrate and to reflect, write your moments, your Slice of Life. Be with your family; enjoy nature, whether you walk the cement jungle or the rural trail. And share your moments and their relief; let the doing, writing and sharing renew your spirit and connect you with others.

As a teacher, my students loved Slice of Life; I’ve written about it here and here. For strategies for writers to revise their slice moments, see the work of Ralph Fletcher and Steve Peha. They both provide for strategies for writers workshop and the six  traits of writing. Through Slice of Life and writing strategies, students learn what Donald Murray expressed, “Writing is hard fun.”  So often over the years, students have said during writing class after sharing, “You’re right, Ms Edwards, writing is hard fun.”

So, for reflection and learning, for hope in good and hard times, write for some hard fun.

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Thunder rumbling

Angry words

Daily insults

Inhumane turmoil

Get up

Stand up

Walk out

Inhale

Breathe

Walk

Hug

People laughing

Welcomed smiles

Daily kindness

Community cares

Lift up

Stand up

Walk in

Shake hands

Smile

Share

Hug

Reflect inward

Connect thoughts

Write down moments

Humanity grows.

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Coffee Photo: Sheri Edwards, AttributionNoncommercialShare AlikeFlickr

Deer Photo, by Scott Hunter, used with permission

Nature and Drive photos, Sheri Edwards [Creative Commons AttributionNoncommercialShare Alike

Doodle by Sheri Edwards

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This post is:

Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today:  Make a stain with a drink; Doodle it into something.

Doodling Song: It’s a Beautiful Morning by The Rascals

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Part of Margaret Gibson’s DigiLit Sunday

digilitsunday

SOL17 DoodleaDay 4

 

hope-renaissance

I am finding hope in these dark times. I know that many of my friends voted for Trump, and I know them to be kind and caring. Therefore, I know we can come together somehow in steadying the foundations of our America.

Hope: In the New York Times, Timothy Egan wrote an uplifting article entitled “A Great New Accidental Renaissance.” Attending a “Search for Hope” conference at a Seattle University, he thought a few people would show up to each event. Instead, the conference was sold out; he writes:

In the winter of the American soul, people thronged to hear advice on how to “live a life of significance and impact” and to “find meaning in times of change, challenge and chaos.”

And he credits Trump for the renaissance:

…because the threats to truth, civility, rational thought and brotherly love coming from the White House have prompted a huge counterreaction.

Although the tweeting Trump supporters consider others lacking in truth, civility, rational thought, and love, in reality, their love is not for all. The people, however, who are protesting are protesting for the rights of all Americans, not just themselves. That’s a huge difference. And this “winter of the American soul” created by the president and his GOP followers has created the inspiration to engage in civic discourse, to assemble together against intolerance and ignorance, and to actively and collectively emphasize the American values this administration seeks to dismiss and mock.  As Timothy Egan says:

we may be experiencing a great awakening for the humane values that are under siege by a dark-side presidency. People are going inward, to find something bigger than Trump, and outward, to limit the damage he inflicts on the country.

Be aware that the GOP are fighting in at least eighteen states against our constitutional right to assemble and our free speech. Although the GOP fight for the right to own and carry any kind of gun as their right according to the Second Amendment of the Constitution, they are perfectly willing to deny your First Amendment right to assemble, to freedom of speech, to petition the government:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

We will no longer take the values of “truth, civility, rational thought and brotherly love” for granted as if they were the natural progression of a civilized society, but rather we will learn and gather together with non-violent and civil strategies to uphold these values in our communities as the great America we know and love.

Gandhi said, “The science of nonviolence can alone lead one to pure democracy.”

This is our time to strengthen our democratic republic and limit the damage to its institutions and Constitution. And the key is civil action by the informed actions of concerned citizens through nonviolence.

Resources:

A Commitment to Nonviolence: The Leadership of John Lewis

Six Principles of Nonviolence by Teaching Tolerance

What nonviolence is [Gandhi].

A Time for Justice: A Teaching Tolerance middle school guide on Civil Rights

Movie: Gandhi — who freed his country, India, through nonviolence

Please add any other resources on nonviolence in the comments.

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Song: Freedom Now by Tracy Chapman, about the life of Nelson Mandela who spent twenty-seven years in jail before freed to fight against Apartheid in South Africa. He and President FW de Klerk won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993, and in1994 Mandela became South Africa’s first democratically elected President.

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Twilight slides to dark

as communities of stars

lead hope towards sunlight.

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Find your communities. Gather in nonviolent actions to retain our values, our access to knowledge, and our spirit as Americans. Always strive to invite the other side to rejoin and reconnect as the one America we have been; ending the divisiveness is a main goal.

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HOPE

Hear each other;

Open communication;

Practice peace and conversation;

Energize communities.

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Practice @DaveGray‘s Visual Alphabet

img_3596_visual_alphabet

 

 

 

 

SOL17 DoodleaDay 3


March 1: Pow! Another punch to the people: attack on protecting our air, water, and land: Cut funding to the Environmental Protection Agency by one-fifth! Read the Washington Post article. Most of the EPA funds are directly paid to states: that means jobs and programs to protect the environment in every state and many Native American reservations will be lost, not to mention what will happen to our environment.

Why did we have the EPA? Read an archive of the history here, although the site may be taken down by the current president who wants to erase history, real factual history.  The history of the Clean Water Act is here. The Verge wrote an excellent article filled with links to explain the reasoning and facts of success for our environment by the EPA: When rivers caught fire and bald eagles were poisoned: why we need the Environmental Protection Agency.

One of the projects was The Love Canal Tragedy. Be vigilant in watching your communities for new outbreaks of pollution. It may take citizens to be the watchdog. And we aren’t the only country where citizens protect the earth. The Ford Foundation shares the story of an heroic, yet tragic citizen in Honduras. Berta Cáceres was murdered for her work to protect her community’s forests and rivers. The good news is that more women are stepping up and through their continued efforts are ensuring changes will occur.

Back in November. The Guardian wrote an article about this issue, which includes suggestions for actions.  Larry Ferlazzo [his website is so filled with resources] provides tons of resources for the environment on his Earth Day page, which he updates.

And, for music, here are 20 Earth Day songs.

My doodling song: Big Yellow Taxi by Joni Mitchell


 

 

 

You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone!

 

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Look today.

Look now.

Take a breath.

Enjoy it’s freshness.

Write today

Write what you see

Take the time

Record the view.

Write tomorrow.

Write the change

Take the actions

Protect our environment.

Write.

Document.

You don’t know what you’ve got

‘Til it’ gone.

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: animal + emotion