SOL17 DoodleaDay Sketch50 Haibun

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A Message from Robins

A Haibun Poem

I awoke to a new day announced at first light by a chorus of robins, a celebration of the last #doodleaday, ready for April 1st — the beginning of #GloPoWriMo or Global Poetry Writing Month.

Robins announce spring,

Chirping, chattering, tweeting

Me awake at four.

Yes, they chirp alarms

Unwanted, unneeded, yet

Inspired a poem, yes?

Oh, haiku power,

joyous chaos rises to

Humble my complaints.

Ha! And we two sing

Word play- Global Poetry

Writing Month: April!

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Tomorrow starts Global Poetry Writing Month [#GloPoWriMo], or in the United States, it was once called National Poetry Writing Month [ #NaPoWriMo], started and nurtured by Maureen Thorson at napowrimo.net.

So when I woke up today, I knew I wanted to start my April off with some ideas. I started with the pre-GloPoWriMo post by Maureen, suggesting a form of poetry I hand not heard of before: haibun. I love the examples, here, which Maureen shared in her post.

What better way to end #doodleaday than with a new style of poetry, especially since the topic today is: Why Do I Doodle?

I doodle to enhance the message. As a participant in Sketch50, I discovered that topic today is “two people talking.”

So my doodle of two people talking in haiku enhances the message of my morning waking up to the dawn of Global Poetry Writing Month.

The prose introduction plus the conversation of haiku creates the haibun poem. What a fun day of sketching and doodling!

Thank you to Royan Lee  for the excellent experience he created for us in #doodleaday prompts!

And thanks to Melvina Kurashige whose tweet helped me with drawing people

And thanks to Deb Baff whose tweet also helped me with drawing my two people talking:

So — if you’re not sure about your drawing skills, develop a growth mindset and do #doodleaday and Sketch50 so you can doodle to enhance your message or to take notes.

And, get ready for National Poetry Month!

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Resources for Poetry Month:

Be sure to check out the resources at Poets.org:

National Poetry Month information, including a downloadable, clickable poster

Poem in Your Pocket Day, April 27 & Find a Poem for Your Pocket

The Dear Poet Project

30 Ways to Celebrate—  #NPM17

A Poem a Day

Thirty Days of Writing Prompts by Kelli Russell Agodon

National Poetry Month links by Sheri

Online Interactives from Read/Write/Think: Theme PoemsAcrostic PoemsDiamante Poems

or learn from poets:

Kinds of Poems by Kathi Mitchell

Ken Nesbitt’s Poetry4Kids

Giggle Poetry How To

Not sure you want to write a poem every day? How about reading one every day. Find one you like. Link to it in your Kidblog and let us know:

Which kind fits you? Why did you chose it? Why is it poetry?

A Poem a Day by GottaBook

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 This blog is:

Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Why Do I Doodle?

Part of Sketch50: two people talking

Part of #GloPoWriMo / #NaPoWriMo  @NaPoWriMo at napowrimo.net started and nurtured by Maureen Thorson

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Doodling Song for Today:

I’ve Got A Name by Jim Croce 

One of the strategies my students follow is to “name it

Not a dog — give it a name: a German Shepherd, or a bouncing white poodle

Not the floor — name with description and nouns: but the muted colored tweed carpet

Or like Jim Croce — not the wind blew but

Like the north wind whistlin’ down the sky

Enjoy this story, this poem, this song by Jim Croce: I’ve Got A Name, because you can picture  the images in your mind…

SOL17 DoodleaDay Map Story


Writing.

If you’re a writer, you know it isn’t easy. If you’re not a writer, you know it’s hard.

Donald Murray assured us that “Writing is hard fun.”

In our classrooms, as students learn and read, and wherever students are, they listen, watch, play, work and learn. They gather ideas and facts; they imagine “what ifs.” And teachers have a responsibility to extend all that learning by providing time for students to think and write, and think and write together. And writing for their personal expression in fact and fiction to share their ideas.

Writing clarifies our ideas; it frees our thoughts, contains our thoughts, and connects our thoughts in new ways. We get better at writing by reading a lot and writing a lot. We get better at writing by sharing our pieces — what we like, what we wonder, what we are confused about– for feedback from others. 

Writers know this. Our students need to experience this, not in assignments, but in writing about what’s important to them, in fact or fiction. Journaling, blogging, writers workshop, genius hour: all are ways to incorporate choice in student writing.

We’ve got to let them develop their style, away from templates and outlines. Students need to experience using what they know– facts, experiences, imaginings– to form ideas into a story [fiction or not]. As students review their writing, they share with a friend and get feedback as they make a choice to abandon or to elaborate and revise. If they like their piece, they can edit and publish.  Without these experiences, the feeling of satisfaction and joy — that hard fun — is not attained. We want students to live as writers, as authors on their own.

And with that experience, their messages become clear, in both their own and in their assignments.

Yes, I want my students think like authors– to make the choices in words and organization, in flow and structure, to build their factual or imaginary story and feel the message understood by others when they share during writing and later in publication. 

I want them to learn through their process and publication that “Writing is hard fun.”

And just perhaps, they’ll compose such a story as…

The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Gordon Lightfoot

Today’s doodling tune in honor of writers and writing, in all its forms.

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Hiding in our minds

Ideas flow and connect;

Stories Awaken.

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers
Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Maps

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Update: As I perused my Facebook feed, I discovered that Ralph Fletcher just made a similar plea, but, of course, he says it much better than I:

Greenbelt Writing: How Low-Stakes, Student-Centered Writing Supports Bold Learning

It’s a great read on Heinemann’s Medium blog.

SOL17 DoodleaDay 7 Inner Critic

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How do you overcome your inner critic?

#DoodleaDay is helping me have that conversation — the one in the above doodle. It’s so common, isn’t it? Especially if you’re just starting a project of any kind. For me it was starting blogging, and then to keep up with blogging.

And now it is doodling– I doodle in lines and squiggles; I’m not an artist, but I think this doodling daily is improving that, along with overcoming my blogging arguments.

So my advice to myself and my readers is to to keep trying — and like that last part on the doodle:

we learn when we read and watch what others do,

so acknowledge those who went before

by honoring them with your take

on what was learned from them,

and share so others learn too.

Just go where your heart takes you and share it–

As sharing like this makes the world great!

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Places I’ve learned:

Resources to Start Blogging:

The Fear of Sharing by George Couros 

A Series of blog posts on blogging by George Couros

Why Educators Blog: A series by Sue Waters from Edublogs.org Scroll down for more posts

A JumpStart in Technology Class by Jennifer Gonzalez [I’ve take it; it’s awesome- my work here]

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Ideas blossom

Doubt hails to destroy, yet melts

to open thought’s bud.

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This post is:

Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today:  Inner Critic Conversation

My Doodling song — one of my very favorites:

Title Song from Star Trek Enterprise: Where My Heart Will Take Me (Faith of the Heart) originally written by Diane Warren, reworked by Dennis McCarthy for Star Trek Enterprise and sung by Russell Watson.

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Doodle by Sheri Edwards

Blossom image and poetry by Sheri Edwards