#140WC Live and Learn

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It’s official. It’s the holiday break.  Kids arrived at school for the last day of the year — and chose “Hour of Code” as their choice activity.  Making things work. It’s a puzzle. It’s a chance to try, fail, and try again. It’s a chance to help each other. It’s constant learning.

As the holiday starts, I’m thankful for the time to learn more — to think about the interests of my students and discover or create curriculum that meets the standards and their interests.

I’m thankful for each day and moment that brings new surprises of wonder. I watched as students huddled together, or called another over, “I don’t get this. How did you solve it?” I could see the interest and sense of community.  I’m thankful my students have this opportunity to problem-solve together — to see how their choices in coding makes things work.

Learning. It should be like this every day. Living and learning to our fullest.

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#140WC #hourofcode everyone a winner

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We did it. Students in grades five, six, seven, and eight completed our Hour Of Code. Every student was a winner, a successful coder to make that Angry Bird get that pig. Every student was a reader too — reading the puzzle and debugging directions. Every student was collaborator — offering assistance to each other so we could all succeed.

And every student said, “This is fun,” not “This is hard.” They are ready for more, and many responded with, “I’m doing this at home.”

So think about it. There’s so much noise in the eduverse about transforming education so students are “college and career ready.” The students need to be prepared for their future — and that means an understanding of the workings of the devices and apps they use daily: computer science — code. Just one thing could do it: allow our students to be makers in the world; coders of the future — as part of their literacy class.

Why? I watched today as everyone read. Everyone.  On their own. Wanting to read. And afterwards, they wrote about their experience. No complaints. MIT’s Mitchel Resnik says

In the process of learning to code, people learn many other things. They are not just learning to code, they are coding to learn. In addition to learning mathematical and computational ideas (such as variables and conditionals), they are also learning strategies for solving problems, designing projects, and communicating ideas. These skills useful not just for computer scientists but for everyone, regardless of age, background, interests, or occupation.

And that’s what we did. We learned to code, and coded to learn. Here are some reflections [see more here]:

Coding is like solving a puzzle because it always has a new layout and as you advance it becomes more challenging, like if you move from a 500 piece puzzle to a 1000 piece.

Behind every click or swipe or touch on my phone is code.

I learned that code is very easy once you understand it, it exercises parts of your mind in a fun way, it opens up a new and faster way for finding answers.

Vocabulary words to know for coding: Repeat; The computer will repeat the command until you reach your destination.

 I liked how it challenged my way of thinking

And students want to learn more, code more, and many plan to code at home.  That’s true learning — wanting to learn.

So what are you waiting for?  Try it: Hour of Code Part One You’ll be a winner too! And you’ll see how coding is part of our literacy learning.

WC: 411

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#140WC #hourofcode

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Tomorrow we try our Hour Of Code. There could be tech trouble. There will be confusion. We may need a back-up plan. There will be, however, collaboration to solve the problems. Because we are persistent; we don’t give up. We have a mindset of “I can.”

Hadi Partovi is the founder of Hour of Code. One of the obstacles to improving education is mindset. Learning computer science needs a new mindset: we can.

Watch this CBS interview in an Hour of Code Classroom to see what Hadi Partovi says:
http://www.cbsnews.com/common/video/cbsnews_player.swf

There’s so much noise in the eduverse about transforming education so students are “college and career ready.” The students need to be prepared for their future — and that means an understanding of the workings of the devices and apps they use daily: computer science — code. Just one thing could do it: allow our students to be makers in the world; coders of the future.

So tomorrow, we take our first step in our middle school. We have a mindset of curiosity. We’re anxious, and expectant. We’re unsure, and hopeful. We’re confused, but open. We. Are. Ready. We — a class together, and a learning community.

How about you?

 

WC: 181

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#140WC Hour of Code

Hour of Code


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Students in grades five, six, seven, and eight will learn a bit of code this Wednesday as we join millions of other students in “Hour of Code” for Computer Science Education Week. We’re going to see the code behind “Angry Birds” as we write the code to make that angry bird move using logic and as few steps as possible. We’ll learn repeat times, repeat until, and repeat else commands.

Don’t know these? Then take some time to do your own Angry Birds Hour of Code. Every one should have access to learn code, and everyone should know something about the bits behind the things we do every day — Facebook, Cell Phones, Browse the Internet. So…

We’re part of the Hour of Code! Are you on the map? Sign up now.
hourofcodemapCross Posted at NSDEdwards

WC: 153

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Quote Source: “Thinkful

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