SOL17 DoodleaDay 18 How To– Share



3.18.17 How To Share

I miss teaching, being in the classroom where students look to the teacher and each other to learn together. I miss how students huddle together to piece together what they are to learn to create authentic work– helping write a blog post to build awareness about the problem of child labor around the world, for example. They share facts, determine the best relevance, and choose the language that makes their point– together in peer review before publishing.

I also miss the one type of meeting that is valuable: our Professional Learning Teams, where we discuss student work and student needs [of all kinds]. We share what worked in each of our classrooms and planned for next steps to help students move forward. Sometimes we planned family conferences to work together with families; sometimes we created graphic organizers for a group of students who needed more structure to learn an objective [such as including 5Ws in writing [who, what, when, where, why]. When we meet again, we reflect on what worked and revise accordingly. It’s a continual process of improvement and innovation.
Both of these actions by groups of people brought diverse people together to share, and with each participant’s perspectives and experiences, better ideas for next steps developed. Sharing with others improves our work and our world.

How Sharing Innovates [ and Why Everyone Matters: For instance, Elders, People from other countries [immigrants, visa-holders]

Have you heard about the amazing new battery? Goodenough Introduces New Battery Technology/ University of Texas

“Goodenough’s latest breakthrough, completed with Cockrell School senior research fellow Maria Helena Braga, is a low-cost all-solid-state battery that is noncombustible and has a long cycle life (battery life) with a high volumetric energy density and fast rates of charge and discharge. The engineers describe their new technology in a recent paper published in the journal Energy & Environmental Science.”
John Goodenough is 94 years old. 

Maria Helena Braga, research fellow, hails from the University of Porto in Portugal.

Imagine if they and their team had not been able to work together? 

Why wouldn’t they be able to?  Immigration bans, protectionism, nationalism. If we build walls, ideas don’t mesh and re-emerge as a benefit to all of us. America is turning away from what made us great: diversity!

Here’s why:

How Diversity Makes Us Smarter shows how diversity encourages us to work harder, be creative, and seek alternatives; it stimulates innovation.

And, hopefully, the elder John Goodenough would not have horrendous health insurance rates and enough coverage to maintain his health and the mind that held the history and facts about glass lithium. Hopefully, he didn’t need Meals on Wheels.

America is supposed to be mostly Christian, but all religions, and those not religious but spiritual [including atheists] hold a basic truth that keeps the human race alive: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. It means caring about each other — and helping our fellow humans. This belief made America great.  Shouldn’t that basic value be our guide? How to get back to caring, sharing, and justice? That’s the biggest How To.
~~~~~~~~~~

Penned

Thoughts

Imagined,

Ideas shared,

Joined in a journey

To live dreams together,

To better the world

For all.

( ..)φ
For all

Live

Beside

In community

Thriving in thoughts,

Imagined understandings

Of acceptance

That’s penned.

( ..)φ

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
NOTE:

Survival of the individual goes to the fittest, but societies only thrive through cooperation and acceptance. We work together or perish.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Doodle a How To
Doodling Song Woodstock– Joni Mitchell
“We are stardust; we are golden; billion year old carbon”

SOL17 DoodleaDay 7 Inner Critic

IMG_3634_inner_critic_dad7.PNG

How do you overcome your inner critic?

#DoodleaDay is helping me have that conversation — the one in the above doodle. It’s so common, isn’t it? Especially if you’re just starting a project of any kind. For me it was starting blogging, and then to keep up with blogging.

And now it is doodling– I doodle in lines and squiggles; I’m not an artist, but I think this doodling daily is improving that, along with overcoming my blogging arguments.

So my advice to myself and my readers is to to keep trying — and like that last part on the doodle:

we learn when we read and watch what others do,

so acknowledge those who went before

by honoring them with your take

on what was learned from them,

and share so others learn too.

Just go where your heart takes you and share it–

As sharing like this makes the world great!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Places I’ve learned:

Resources to Start Blogging:

The Fear of Sharing by George Couros 

A Series of blog posts on blogging by George Couros

Why Educators Blog: A series by Sue Waters from Edublogs.org Scroll down for more posts

A JumpStart in Technology Class by Jennifer Gonzalez [I’ve take it; it’s awesome- my work here]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

haiku sol17 blossoms hail.001.jpeg

Ideas blossom

Doubt hails to destroy, yet melts

to open thought’s bud.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This post is:

Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today:  Inner Critic Conversation

My Doodling song — one of my very favorites:

Title Song from Star Trek Enterprise: Where My Heart Will Take Me (Faith of the Heart) originally written by Diane Warren, reworked by Dennis McCarthy for Star Trek Enterprise and sung by Russell Watson.

~~~~~~~~~

Doodle by Sheri Edwards

Blossom image and poetry by Sheri Edwards

Perhaps I is an acceptable way to WE #immooc

Collaborationisamplification.png

Have you ever received pushback when sharing, “I did…”  It’s common. Eyes rolling. Arms folding. It’s a problem.

In conversation about this with others, it was easy to accept the ideas they suggested to not use the word “I.” Those sharing the solution used the word “I.” They used the word “I” because it’s their way to solve the problem of pushback and that’s how the issue needed to be framed and could be framed in our trusted conversations. They found a problem, and they solved it, and they shared it, using “I.”

To dig into this idea further, perhaps in some schools, the trust among teachers is too low and the willingness to share to further improve student learning is also not developed.

Teachers are professionals, yet coaches and others continuously, not purposefully, intrude on that professionalism.

The sad thing is, that we want people to share, so to not be able to use the word “I” to put oneself out there, take a risk, and share “your” classroom strategies, without “eye-rolling” and pushback. — that is a problem.

So, yes, a strategy suggested is to use the word “we,” as in the above paragraph.. Asking inviting questions [ “Has anyone tried…”], another suggestion, also works.

Still, people need to feel safe to share; teachers need to share their ideas and experiences so the school knows, teams know, and peers know the ins and outs of what instruction and learning is occurring.

So, what else could be done so everyone is actively listening and willing to share?

How can this negative mindset be flipped for active, interested engagement by all staff?

This is a problem for many innovative leaders.

One strategy making the rounds again is establishing “norms” of behavior everyone will agree to, such as:

  • Honest and forthcoming with communication
  • Speak up and ask clarifying questions.
  • Respect others’ ideas positively; listen and engage respectfully.
  • Be interested
  • Be professional, on time, prepared.

However norms like this can also receive pushback since norms– well, don’t they seem obvious?

Perhaps a reminder of the school mission and purpose statement at the beginning of the sharing meeting would be helpful. Again, this keeps the vision on “ours” and “we” in mind: our goals are the same; we can learn together.

Perhaps the sharing could be framed as a possibility with the listeners sharing afterwards what could work in their classrooms, so that everyone is using the “I” word.

Perhaps sharing the Two Rules of Improv used in Pixar as explained by Randy Nelson for Edutopia would help develop a more accepting mindset (video at end of post).

The two rules are:

1. Accept all offers
2. Make your partner look good.

How could “the offer,” the sharing, be more acceptable?

Share reflectively. Reflection includes what one would do next time to improve. As Randy Nelson says, it’s “error recovery, not failure avoidance.” Frame the sharing as a problem solved. People share “I tried this…, and next time I would…” which shows a willingness to recover, improve, and master.

How does the listener make their partner, the sharer, look good?



Listeners are interested when they know there’s a dilemma, and so accept the offer. And listeners must not judge or make suggestions for the sharer; instead they accept the share as a starting point and build or adapt a possible version for their own work. According to Randy Nelson, this is collaboration: amplification of ideas. “Possible” means they don’t have to actually do it, but they are interested and have given the person sharing an acknowledgement. This is where technology helps; perhaps open a Padlet for sharing these possible amplifications. Again, this is a mindset shift: be interested in what others have to offer, not just share what is interesting, and collaborate: each listener accepts an offer of ideas and amplifies a small idea which opens up possibilities for everyone.

And sharing of something actually done shows a “proof of a portfolio, rather than the promise of a resume,” as Randy Nelson says. These conversations framed as collaborative amplification to build ideas for everyone could build trust, gather ideas for everyone to improve, gather input for portfolios, and perhaps become an entry point for blogging to share further. The word “I” shows risk, reflection, problem-solving, and trust, whether as original sharer or as amplifier.

Somehow, sharing with an “I” needs to be acceptable. Reviewing vision statements, using “we,” asking “I wonder if..” or other questions, establishing norms, and framing conversations as collaborative amplification could help develop trust and focus. Still, sharing needs to be acceptable.

What other ways could the mindset of “I” to build “we” be developed into acceptability?

How about amplifying the idea with yours in this Padlet or in the comments below?