Fifty Days of Sketching

Fifty Days of Sketching with #Sketch50 from sketch50.org

Follow my own “growth mindset” as I accept a sketching challenge to improve my art and my message.

Thank you to all Sketch50 creators and participants for learning with me. By sharing our work, we learned from each other.

Thank you authors for the awesome prompts and badges.

Had such fun learning and creating– while learning more each day. From basic shapes to lettering and stick people, improving these skills gives me more confidence to do more. We even were encouraged to try animation. I used both DoInk and Sketchbook Motion.

Want to try: Just join in now at sketch50.org and start your challenge today!

My Flickr Sketch50 Album:

https://flickr.com/photos/35786276@N08/sets/72157682006086766

Sketch50 Music SRE

 

This #sketch50 inspired me to try another animation. I drew the image in Sketchbook Pro and exported it  to  import into Sketchbook Motion.  I exported just the large heart next to add into Motion to animate as “Music lifts our hearts.”

 

I also learned how to save it as a gif in iCloud to import into wordpress. 🙂

Image

Shoot for the moon…

Shoot4theMoon.gif

Animation is a big thing, and I’ve stayed away from it. I’m not an artist, so simple sketches are a difficult.

Sketch50 [sketch50.org] has helped; I’ve improved, so I thought I’d try animation.

Today I worked with Sketchbook Motion — it’s got a lot of fun features as you can see in the gif. I can make a path, grow more parts [not shown], create particles [stars].  I couldn’t see how to adjust the timeline of events, but there’s a lot more to learn. It works in layers similar to the Sketchbook Pro app I’ve been learning for drawing.

Who knows what’s next in the visual world, but animation to express ideas is a big deal now. I worry, though, that too much may be left to the reader who may misinterpret the writer’s meaning if the voice of the writer in text is missing.

I’m also trying Doink, which has many tutorials to help get started. Here’s my first:


As you see, I’m shooting for the moon and might land on a few stars to help me learn.

SOL17 DoodleaDay Sketch50 Haibun

doodleaday_end_sketch50_haibun_3752

A Message from Robins

A Haibun Poem

I awoke to a new day announced at first light by a chorus of robins, a celebration of the last #doodleaday, ready for April 1st — the beginning of #GloPoWriMo or Global Poetry Writing Month.

Robins announce spring,

Chirping, chattering, tweeting

Me awake at four.

Yes, they chirp alarms

Unwanted, unneeded, yet

Inspired a poem, yes?

Oh, haiku power,

joyous chaos rises to

Humble my complaints.

Ha! And we two sing

Word play- Global Poetry

Writing Month: April!

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Tomorrow starts Global Poetry Writing Month [#GloPoWriMo], or in the United States, it was once called National Poetry Writing Month [ #NaPoWriMo], started and nurtured by Maureen Thorson at napowrimo.net.

So when I woke up today, I knew I wanted to start my April off with some ideas. I started with the pre-GloPoWriMo post by Maureen, suggesting a form of poetry I hand not heard of before: haibun. I love the examples, here, which Maureen shared in her post.

What better way to end #doodleaday than with a new style of poetry, especially since the topic today is: Why Do I Doodle?

I doodle to enhance the message. As a participant in Sketch50, I discovered that topic today is “two people talking.”

So my doodle of two people talking in haiku enhances the message of my morning waking up to the dawn of Global Poetry Writing Month.

The prose introduction plus the conversation of haiku creates the haibun poem. What a fun day of sketching and doodling!

Thank you to Royan Lee  for the excellent experience he created for us in #doodleaday prompts!

And thanks to Melvina Kurashige whose tweet helped me with drawing people

And thanks to Deb Baff whose tweet also helped me with drawing my two people talking:

So — if you’re not sure about your drawing skills, develop a growth mindset and do #doodleaday and Sketch50 so you can doodle to enhance your message or to take notes.

And, get ready for National Poetry Month!

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Resources for Poetry Month:

Be sure to check out the resources at Poets.org:

National Poetry Month information, including a downloadable, clickable poster

Poem in Your Pocket Day, April 27 & Find a Poem for Your Pocket

The Dear Poet Project

30 Ways to Celebrate—  #NPM17

A Poem a Day

Thirty Days of Writing Prompts by Kelli Russell Agodon

National Poetry Month links by Sheri

Online Interactives from Read/Write/Think: Theme PoemsAcrostic PoemsDiamante Poems

or learn from poets:

Kinds of Poems by Kathi Mitchell

Ken Nesbitt’s Poetry4Kids

Giggle Poetry How To

Not sure you want to write a poem every day? How about reading one every day. Find one you like. Link to it in your Kidblog and let us know:

Which kind fits you? Why did you chose it? Why is it poetry?

A Poem a Day by GottaBook

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 This blog is:

Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Why Do I Doodle?

Part of Sketch50: two people talking

Part of #GloPoWriMo / #NaPoWriMo  @NaPoWriMo at napowrimo.net started and nurtured by Maureen Thorson

glopo2017button1

Doodling Song for Today:

I’ve Got A Name by Jim Croce 

One of the strategies my students follow is to “name it

Not a dog — give it a name: a German Shepherd, or a bouncing white poodle

Not the floor — name with description and nouns: but the muted colored tweed carpet

Or like Jim Croce — not the wind blew but

Like the north wind whistlin’ down the sky

Enjoy this story, this poem, this song by Jim Croce: I’ve Got A Name, because you can picture  the images in your mind…

SOL17 DoodleaDay 30 Tools and Spaces

doodleaday_30_tools_spaces.sre

Doodling is writing in images. The flow for each is similar: idea-draft-share-elaborate-revise-share-enhance-edit-publish. And publishing can be private, shared with a few, public on websites, social media, blogs, journals, etc.

For me, and again like writing, I prefer the digital. The ability to cut/paste/re-order/undo/redo just makes the process of thinking through the challenge to create the best message is just such a gift. This is especially important with art– because I’m not an artist. I’d be crunching up paper and eventually be buried in snowballs of wrecked work. I’d be frustrated and quit. But with the digital, I try over and over and feel like I can improve and understand better what each stroke, brush, line does to bring out the image. It’s fun.

I think that’s important to understand for students in writing class: why drearily write by hand when the words are so easily created, ordered, deleted, enhanced with the tools available in digital format? Handwriting? That’s now art! Make it fun, on paper or digital.

The #Sketch50 theme this week is Communication, and today’s topic is page/book/device. Notice what changed from the #doodleaday of “Tools and Spaces:

sketch50_page.book.device.sre

First of all, you can see that I just needed to copy the #doodleaday to my Sketch50 journal in Paper53. To make the icons I just searched Google [icon Blogger, for example]. Then I could zoom in and create an image pretty close to the icon of  the app that I use for communication of ideas.

Sharing Google Docs, in blogs, on Twitter, in Evernote, through presentations [Keynote or Slides]– those are ways for me to curate ideas and collaborate.

And the information is from my experiences, my books [Kindle], news apps, research in Google Search.

I do have a journal, which I hardly use, and Staedtler fine point pens, for the occasional sketching I do for a quick idea– rare. I also do a little ZenTangle art, but mostly in my Paper53 and Autodesk Sketchbook apps. My pens last a long time.

But whatever writing I do — text or image – I just think, get an idea, and then dive in, digitally.

I visited school yesterday. Actually, I was the substitute Principal. It was a wonderful experience– I could see the flow of the day, and found smiles on student faces, which means the school is doing well for kids. I wrote on paper [!] a log of what I did. I wrote “Tootles”– oodles of them in each classroom I visited. Tootles are acknowledgements of students who are models of goodness: Good thinking, good questions, good answers, good effort, good attitude– each is written specifically for and given to one child. I was able to hear good questions, acknowledge a change in attitude, a willingness to listen again and correct mistakes, etc. It was awesome.

I was also reminded of the challenge in writing — the biggest challenge– the start. That first word or image. That blank paper or screen. In my experience, the best way to overcome that obstacle is three-fold:

  1. Model examples [if needed, non-examples as well]
  2. Model and try with students; Share and find the positive.
  3. Conversation: discuss the trials and encourage discussion of what the examples suggest– what else could have been tried or done or reworded?

I found that modeling, guiding a reworking or new ideas, and then having conversations with students, and students with each other, gets them thinking about their own ideas and experiences. Soon, one by one, each student is able to start.

If you are new to teaching writing, I’ve always recommended these:

Ralph Fletcher Books

Lessons for the Writers Notebook and Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi by Heinemann

In the Middle by Nancie Atwell

Vicki Spandel Six Traits

Six Trait Writing by Northwest Labs

Teaching that Makes Sense by Steve Peha

If you are a writer, what is your flow? Are you digital or paper?

If you are a teacher, what strategies do you suggest for helping students start?

If you are a teacher, what resources do you recommend?

We all need tools and spaces, and once we help each other consider the possibilities– starting  is not an issue.

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A Poem for Three Writing Voices: On Starting

Stuck.

Blank.

[Sigh]

“What?”

“Nothing – You?”

“Look – whale’s tales”

“Whales tales?”

“I couldn’t draw

the whole whale.”

“Me too.

I drew my dog

in the  wheat field.

Just the head.”

“Oh.”

“Yeah!”

“That works!”

“Yeah, that works.”

“Oh.”

“I know.”

“What?”

“What?”

“It’s a square.”

“It’s my cat in a box.”

“Now I can write.”

“Yeah–we looked

for that cat

for an hour!”

“I know.”

“How to Find a Cat”

“That works!”

“That does work.”

“Shhhh.”

“I’m writing.”

 

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Doodling Song

I was going to listen to “We’ve Got the Whole World In Our Hands,” but then I stumbled on the same song, remixed for Earth Day: Official Music Video for one of DARIA’s Earth Day CD songs: We’ve Got The Whole World In Our Hands.

It’s got some great images — I imagine a class set of doodles / sketches could be used to create a similar version.

 

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Tools and Spaces

Part of Sketch50: page/book/device

 

SOL17 DoodleaDay First Amendment

doodleaday_first_amendment_triangle

One of my favorite parts of teaching in the middle school is the sense of fairness students demand. Learning about our basic rights to help them formulate a rebuttal to unfair rules is a real world lesson. Students all call out, “Freedom of Speech!” when they complain, and discovering there is a responsibility and a process that accompanies that freedom from the Bill of Rights of our Constitution gives them the skills to make change. Right in that first amendment it says:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Helping students formulate petitions for their frustration at not being able to chew gum, wear hats, or use electronic devices– and receiving redress in some way for those complaints, which stem from their middle school needs is a powerful experience and lesson. I’ve found it to also raise the level of understanding for students for rules, and the level of their acceptance of leadership and responsibility.

I think we all need to review our Bill of Rights, and participate as citizens more actively by participating in community conversations to bring about understanding, acceptance, and compromise.

Here is the Public Domain copy of First Amendment:

Amendment_1

My Sketch50 topic today was ‘megaphone’ or ‘microphone.’  It fits with this topic:

sketch50_microphone_first_amendment.jpg

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The vote is cast

The order given

Denying humanity

It’s unforgiven.

Groups here

Groups there

In every group

Bad, too, finds a lair.

Bad / good

Found in all

So single none:

Else divided we fall.

Come together

Speaking, Attending

Focus solutions:

Not one, but many.

Humanity

Community

Country

United, Indivisibly.

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Morehouse College: We Shall Overcome  And here is Pete Seeger in

And Pete Seeger historical civil rights recording [1963]:

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Part of Slice of Life 2017 by The Two Writing Teachers

Part of DoodleaDay by Royan Lee— today: Triangle Concept